"Wishlist" Datasets

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"Wishlist" Datasets

Community Energy Use Mapping

City's and communities wishing to plan and implement community-scale energy reduction, energy efficiency, and clean energy system (ex. district energy, community-scale solar, etc.) deployment lack information on their community’s energy use. Efforts in NYC and San Francisco-using benchmarking laws for data collection-have been able to spatially understand the use of energy resources (ex. elec, ng, fuel oil) throughout ...more »

Submitted by (@billeger)

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11 votes
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"Wishlist" Datasets

Smart Meter Interval Data: Availability Info Needed

Smart meter installations and pledges to support Green Button have been a big step in the right direction. Yet, at present, many utility consumers cannot access their data from newly installed meters. Ultimately, a meter is only "smart" if its data is available to its user. PROBLEM Information about smart meter "deployment" is usually narrowly focused on whether advanced ("smart") metering infrastructure (AMI) has ...more »

Submitted by (@sambrooks)

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18 votes
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"Wishlist" Datasets

Comprehensive Data on Wind Farm Production By Site

Our dream dataset: open data on the actual realized performance of all wind farms in the US, and/or any data it holds on actual measured wind resources at different sites, in any format the DOE chooses. We believe this data could be captured from Treasury/DOE records on production tax credit reporting, which were required of all US wind farms over the past few years. With this data, the wind industry in general, and ...more »

Submitted by (@dpike0)

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6 votes
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"Wishlist" Datasets

Better Green Button Data Accessibility

Currently access to Green Button data is very restrictive which limits its intended benefits and consumer market penetration. 1. LIMITATION: - The user has to login to their utility company's website with their account login to access the Green Button data. This limits any automated solution by 3rd party providers which is required for real world applications. Otherwise, in almost all cases, the solution fails since ...more »

Submitted by (@theraj)

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1 vote
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"Wishlist" Datasets

Enabling Distributed Generation with Open Grid Data

Distributed renewable energy generation—particularly solar PV—has grown dramatically in the last few years, but developers continue to be obstructed by soft costs and implementation barriers. The federal government is already working to address this problem through DOE’s Sunshot Initiative—partially by encouraging utilities and local governments to streamline their solar permitting and approval processes—but there is ...more »

Submitted by (@ryancook)

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10 votes
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"Wishlist" Datasets

Open Solar Radiation - Wish List Data Set

Greetings Earthlings - Edison figured it out over a 100 years ago. Localize supply at demand. You are finally going back to the future. You are building solar panels across your planet. But you have missed a network. A network of solar radiation sensors. Build this network to understand the expected generation of solar panels. Then open this data. Share this data with developers. The developers will uncover spectacular ...more »

Submitted by (@backtothefuturegrid)

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0 votes
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"Wishlist" Datasets

Standardize all energy data with US Census Boundaries

I propose that all datasets that are released from any governmental organization should be standardized in such a way such that they are easily relatable to the units of measurement that the US Census uses (preferably, counties, tracts, block-groups and blocks). At the moment, data provided by the Federal Government is near impossible to relate to small spatial units (for example a block-group contains ~1000s of people). ...more »

Submitted by (@daithiquinn)

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6 votes
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"Wishlist" Datasets

National Solar Gardens Database

California, Colorado, and other states are beginning to experiment with an idea called “Solar Gardens,” a concept where a group of homeowners band together to pay for solar panels on a remote property. The consumer gets all of the benefits of having installed the panels on their own home, but without the delay and challenge of doing so. Since the panels are installed on an ideal site, the panels are cheaper to install, ...more »

Submitted by (@scott0)

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3 votes
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